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vivienw

2 days ago by @vivienw · View  

Mayo Clinic Minute: Stem cells reduce pain of knee arthritis

person with injured knee and knee painMany people suffer from painful and debilitating osteoarthritis of the knee. In a recent study, experts at Mayo Clinic tested the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells to reduce arthritic pain and disability. 

In this Mayo Clinic Minute, reporter Vivien Williams talks to Dr. Shane Shapiro about how stem cell therapy offers great hope for the future of osteoarthritis treatment.

Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute

2016 World Stem Cell Summit

Dr. Shapiro and his colleagues in the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine are co-sponsors of the 2016 World Stem Cell Summit, which is being held in West Palm Beach, Florida.

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (0:56) is in the downloads. Read the script.

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kevinpunsky

3 days ago by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic finds surprising results on first-ever test of stem cell therapy to treat arthritis

medical illustration of stem cells

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida have conducted the world’s first prospective, blinded and placebo-controlled clinical study to test the benefit of using bone marrow stem cells, a regenerative medicine therapy, to reduce arthritic pain and disability in knees.

The researchers say such testing is needed because there are at least 600 stem cell clinics in the U.S. offering one form of stem cell therapy or another to an estimated 100,000-plus patients, who pay thousands of dollars, out of pocket, for the treatment, which has not undergone demanding clinical study.

The findings in The American Journal of Sports Medicine include an anomalous finding — patients not only had a dramatic improvement in the knee that received stem cells, but also in their other knee, which also had painful arthritis but received only a saline control injection. Each of the 25 patients enrolled in the study had two bad knees, but did not know which knee received the stem cells.

Given that the stem cell-treated knee was no better than the control-treated knee — both were significantly better than before the study began — the researchers say the stem cells’ effectiveness remains somewhat uninterpretable. They are only able to conclude the procedure is safe to undergo as an option for knee pain, but they cannot yet recommend it for routine arthritis care.

“Our findings can be interpreted in ways that we now need to test — one of which is that bone marrow stem cell injection in one ailing knee can relieve pain in both affected knees in a systemic or whole-body fashion,” says the study’s lead author, Shane Shapiro, M.D., a Mayo Clinic orthopedic physician.

Journalists, sound bites with Dr. Shane Shapiro are available in the downloads below.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

“One hypothesis is that the stem cells we tested can home to areas of injury where they are needed, which makes sense, given that stem cells injected intravenously in cancer treatments end up in the patients’ bone marrow where they need to go,” he says. “This is just a theory that can explain our results, so it needs further testing.”

Another explanation is that merely injecting any substance into a knee offered relief from pain.

“That could be, but both this idea and the notion that a placebo effect could be involved would be surprising, given that some patients are still doing very well years after their study treatment ended,” says Dr. Shapiro.

He adds that these findings are important because while use of a patient’s own stem cells for regenerative therapy is extraordinarily popular, the treatments may be untested and are often poorly regulated.

Stem cell clinics often offer expensive treatments for conditions that range from multiple sclerosis, lung and heart disease, to cosmetic treatments, such as facelifts. None of these techniques have been studied because clinics maintain that use of a patient’s own cells is not a drug.

But, depending on how they are processed and used, stem cells can, in fact, be regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as biological products or drugs requiring rigorous safety and efficacy approval processes. In early September, the FDA held scientific meetings to clarify how to regulate such practices.

Mayo Clinic researchers developed their study with FDA approval.

“We feel that if we are going to offer any stem cell procedures to our patients, the science needs to be worked out,” Dr. Shapiro says.

The study was conducted in Mayo’s Human Cell Therapy Lab. Researchers extracted 60 to 90 milliliters of bone marrow from each patient, then filtered it, removed all blood cells, and concentrated it down to 4 to 5 milliliters. The solution, which contained tens of thousands of stem cells, was injected into a patient’s knee using ultrasound-guided imagery.

“We actually counted all of the stem cells with markers that are accepted by the FDA, and we made sure they would be able to survive inside the patient,” Dr. Shapiro says. “Counting is expensive. Most clinics just draw the cells from bone marrow or fat and inject them back into the patient without checking for stem cells, hoping that patients get better,” he says.

Dr. Shapiro and his colleagues are currently designing new studies that will test whether the stem cells home to distant areas of injuries, as well as exploring other implications suggested in their findings.

Study investigators include Mayo Clinic in Florida senior author Mary L. O’Connor, M.D., Shari E. Kazmerchak, Michael G. Heckman, and Abba C. Zubair, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. O’Connor is now at Yale University.

Funding for this study was from Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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stheimer

Mon, Nov 14 at 8:00am EST by @stheimer · View  

Mayo Clinic research sheds light on why some rheumatoid arthritis patients respond poorly to biologics

rheumatoid arthritis illustrationSAN FRANCISCO­ — A Mayo Clinic study is shedding light on why some rheumatoid arthritis patients respond poorly when treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, part of a class of drugs called biologics. It comes down to proteins: specifically, a protein in the body that drives inflammation in the disease, the research found. The discovery is an important step toward better personalizing rheumatoid arthritis treatment, helping to avoid trial and error when prescribing medications. The findings were presented at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in San Francisco.

Researchers found that patients with a higher amount or higher proportion of an inflammatory protein called type 1 interferon beta compared with another inflammatory protein, type 1 interferon alpha, do not respond as well to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors as others. They looked at white blood cells called monocytes, a major cell type involved in rheumatoid arthritis, and found that those cells behaved differently in one group than in the other.

The discovery paves the way for a more personalized approach to treatment in rheumatoid arthritis based on the biology of a particular patient’s disease.

“Investigating these pathways may identify other targets for therapy or other markers that predict treatment response,” says first author Theresa Wampler Muskardin, M.D., a rheumatologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “It will help rheumatologists find the right drug for each patient and spare patients medications that won’t work for them.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Sharon Theimer in Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005 or [email protected]

The Rheumatology Research Foundation funded the study. Mayo rheumatologist Timothy Niewold, M.D., was the study’s senior author.

In other studies presented at the meeting, Mayo Clinic researchers found:

  • Sarcoidosis, the growth of tiny clusters of inflammatory cells called granulomas, carries a higher risk of heart disease and venous thromboembolism. Researchers also found there is seasonal variation in the incidence of sarcoidosis: Rates are consistently lower in autumn. Physicians believe that sarcoidosis may be triggered by the body’s immune response to environmental factors, such as something inhaled from the air.

Mayo rheumatologists and cardiologists formed the Mayo Clinic Cardio-Rheumatology Clinic to research and pioneer better prevention, detection and treatment of heart disease and other cardiovascular problems in patients with rheumatic diseases.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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jstreed

Thu, Oct 27 at 12:38pm EST by @jstreed · View  

Arthritis rate: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Shreyasee Amin comments on numbers out from the CDC on the rates of arthritis.

To listen, click the link below.

Arthritis Rate

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laureljkelly

Mon, Oct 3 at 7:00am EST by @laureljkelly · View  

Housecall: It's flu shot time again

a health care provider with gloves on giving a person a flu shot injection in the upper arm

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It's often assumed that the most successful people have inherited a gift from the gods, but they're also totally committed to their craft.

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jstreed

Fri, Sep 30 at 12:02pm EST by @jstreed · View  

Hand arthritis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Shreyasee Amin addresses some of the risk factors for osteoarthritis in the hand.

To listen, click the link below.

Hand Arthritis

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stheimer

Wed, Sep 28 at 1:00pm EST by @stheimer · View  

Medical mysteries: Seeing right doctor for rheumatic disease is key

close-up of hands with rheumatoid arthritisMedical mysteries have become the topic for several popular television shows – allowing large TV audiences a quick glimpse into the challenges faced by those who suffer from rare, bizarre, or little-known illnesses. In an hour or less, viewers can see how mysterious symptoms and wrong diagnoses cause years of frustration and suffering when medical answers prove illusive.

There are millions of other Americans, whose stories don’t make it onto television, suffering from a constellation of confounding symptoms that make life painful and difficult – all while stumping their health care providers. The fortunate ones eventually make their way to a doctor who recognizes the telltale signs of these mysterious and debilitating illnesses, and – if caught early enough – can do something to help.

As rheumatologists at Mayo Clinic, my colleagues and I have had the opportunity to treat hundreds of these patients with previously undiagnosed “mystery” diseases – with symptoms ranging from joint and muscle pain, inflammation and swelling, to eye irritation, general fatigue, hair loss, dry eyes, chest pain, seizures and even stroke. It’s not uncommon for previously healthy adults and children to suddenly and inexplicably lose function and begin experiencing odd symptoms and unrelenting pain.

While not immediately or easily recognizable, these sometimes peculiar presentations can indicate serious rheumatic illness.  There are, in fact, hundreds of conditions often lumped under the umbrella term “arthritis” affecting more than 52 million Americans. Rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, Sjögren’s syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis are a few of the most common.

Suffering for years without answers or treatment is not only frustrating for patients; it can create irreversible, long-term damage to the body’s joints and tissues. That’s why it’s crucial that persistent, unexplainable, troubling symptoms be promptly investigated by a trained rheumatologist.

Perhaps the most important thing for the public to keep in mind is that rheumatic diseases are much more than the aches and pains of getting older. They are serious, debilitating, and increase the risk for even greater health issues if not treated within the first few weeks or months after symptoms first appear. Individuals living with rheumatic diseases may be at increased risk of cancer, heart diseases, kidney failure, diabetes, lung diseases and miscarriages, just to name a few.

With such a broad range of health consequences, it’s not surprising that rheumatic diseases are the leading cause of disability in America – even more than heart disease, cancer or diabetes. They are also expensive, costing the U.S. health care system and economy an estimated $128 billion annually, including approximately $80.8 billion in annual medical expenditures and $47 billion in indirect costs, such as lost earnings.

This September, as we recognize the first Rheumatic Disease Awareness Month sponsored by the American College of Rheumatology, I hope that anyone experiencing troubling, inexplicable symptoms will take steps to find out whether they might be suffering from one of the many rheumatic illnesses that are frequently undiagnosed. An excellent first step is visiting SimpleTasks.org to learn more about these conditions, and identifying a local, trained rheumatologist who can help. While there is currently no cure for rheumatic diseases, early intervention and treatment provided by a rheumatologist can help patients manage symptoms and maintain a normal quality of life.

For millions of Americans, solving the “mystery” behind many frightening health conditions could be as simple as becoming more educated about symptoms – and learning how and when to seek help.

Eric L. Matteson, M.D., M.P.H., rheumatologist and professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.; president, Rheumatology Research Foundation of the American College of Rheumatology.

JOURNALISTS: To interview Dr. Matteson, please contact Sharon Theimer, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected].

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laureljkelly

Wed, Sep 28 at 7:00am EST by @laureljkelly · View  

Consumer Health Tips: How healthy is gluten-free?

the words "gluten free" written on a chalkboard surrounded by bread, pasta and vegetables

Is gluten-free a healthy way to eat?
A gluten-free diet is recommended for some specific medical reasons, including celiac disease and gluten sensitivy. Beyond this, there's little evidence that a gluten-free diet offers any particular health benefits, but it can be a healthy way to eat, depending on your food choices.

***

Also in today's tips ...

Opioids: Safe for older people with arthritis?

Alzheimer's: Making mealtimes easier

Sick baby? When to seek medical attention

Pneumonia: Prevention

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danasparks

Tue, Sep 20 at 2:00pm EST by @danasparks · View  

Discovery's Edge: The rheumatoid arthritis and heart disease connection

a medical illustration for rheumatoid arthritis and heart disease graphic on Discovery's Edge

Physicians have long known that people with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic conditions such as lupus are more likely to die at younger ages than are those without these conditions. Even with advances in treatment, the gap in life expectancy remains.

No one knew why until 15 years ago. That’s when researchers at Mayo Clinic helped establish that people with rheumatoid arthritis have a greater chance of developing various types of cardiovascular disease.

“We now know that rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an increased risk of heart and vascular disease,” says senior researcher Sherine E. Gabriel, M.D., a rheumatologist and epidemiologist previously in the Department of Health Sciences Research at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota. “What is less understood is why people with rheumatoid arthritis develop that increased risk.”

The evidence increasingly points to inflammation as a major contributor to that increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

In rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system attacks the synovium — the lining of the membranes around the joints. The resulting inflammation thickens the synovium, which can, in turn, eventually destroy cartilage and bone in the joint.

Inflammation can also cause the inner linings of arteries to swell. This narrows the arteries, raises blood pressure, and reduces blood flow to the heart and other organs.
Read the rest of the article on Discovery's Edge.
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Find more research news on Discovery's Edge.

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mforliti

Thu, Aug 11 at 8:16am EST by @mforliti · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Link Senescent Cells to Most Common Form of Arthritis

close-up of hands with rheumatoid arthritisROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic have reported a causal link between senescent cells — cells that accumulate with age and contribute to frailty and disease — and osteoarthritis in mice. Their findings appear online in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences.

Osteoarthritis is the leading form of arthritis in the elderly, causing pain, disability and immobility. The disease impacted 30.8 million adults from 2008 to 2011, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The only therapeutics currently available include treatments focused on pain control, joint replacement surgery or mobility aides, such as canes, braces and walkers.

“Osteoarthritis has previously been associated with the accumulation of senescent cells in or near the joints, however, this is the first time there has been evidence of a causal link,” says James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging. “Additionally, we have developed a new senescent cell transplantation model that allows us to test whether clearing senescent cells alleviates or delays osteoarthritis.”

Using the new model, researchers injected small numbers of senescent and non-senescent cells from ear cartilage into the knee joint area of mice. After tracking the injected cells in the mice for more than 10 days using bioluminescence and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, they found that the injection of the senescent cells into the knee region caused leg pain, impaired mobility and characteristics of osteoarthritis, including damage to surrounding cartilage, X-ray changes, increased pain and impaired function.

“We believe that targeting senescent cells could be a promising way to prevent or alleviate age-related osteoarthritis,” says Dr. Kirkland. “While there is more work to be done, these findings are a critical step toward that goal.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Megan Forliti, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health grants R01 AG013925, R21 AG047984, K01AR065397, R01AR068103, MRM2015 6272; the Orthopedic Research and Education Foundation in collaboration with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute; The Connor Group; and the Noaber Foundation.

Others on the research team include: Ming Xu, Ph.D.; Elizabeth Bradley, M.D.; Megan Weivoda, Ph.D.; Soyun Hwang; Tamar Pirtskhalava, Ph.D.; Teresa Decklever; Geoffry Curran; Mikolaj Ogrodnik; Kurt Johnson; Val Lowe, M.D.; Tamar Tchkonia, Ph.D.; and Jennifer Westendorf, Ph.D., all of Mayo Clinic, as well as Diana Jurk of Newcastle University.

Mayo Clinic and Drs. Kirkland, Tchkonia, and Pirtskhalava have a financial interest related to this research.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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coletterector

Mon, Jul 11 at 11:57am EST by @coletterector · View  

Study: Gut Bacteria can Cause, Predict and Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis

close-up of elderly hands

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The bacteria in your gut do more than break down your food. They also can predict susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis, suggests Veena Taneja, Ph.D., an immunologist at Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine. Dr. Taneja recently published two studies ─ one in Genome Medicine and one in Arthritis and Rheumatology ─ connecting the dots between gut microbiota and rheumatoid arthritis.

More than 1.5 million Americans have rheumatoid arthritis, a disorder that causes painful swelling in the joints. Scientists have a limited understanding of the processes that trigger the disease. Dr. Taneja and her team identified intestinal bacteria as a possible cause; their studies indicate that testing for specific microbiota in the gut can help physicians predict and prevent the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

“These are exciting discoveries that we may be able to use to personalize treatment for patients,” Dr. Taneja says.

The paper published in Genome Medicine summarizes a study of rheumatoid arthritis patients, their relatives and a healthy control group. The study aimed to find a biomarker — or a substance that indicates a disease, condition or phenomena — that predicts susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. They noted that an abundance of certain rare bacterial lineages causes a microbial imbalance that is found in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

MEDIA CONTACT: Colette Rector, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

“Using genomic sequencing technology, we were able to pin down some gut microbes that were normally rare and of low abundance in healthy individuals, but expanded in patients with rheumatoid arthritis,” Dr. Taneja says.

Implications for predicting and preventing rheumatoid arthritis

After further research in mice and, eventually, humans, intestinal microbiota and metabolic signatures could help scientists build a predictive profile for who is likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis and the course the disease will take, Dr. Taneja says.

Based on mouse studies, researchers found an association between the gut microbe Collinsella and the arthritis phenotype. The presence of these bacteria may lead to new ways to diagnose patients and to reduce the imbalance that causes rheumatoid arthritis before or in its early stages, according to John Davis III, M.D., and Eric Matteson, M.D., Mayo Clinic rheumatologists and study co-authors. Continued research could lead to preventive treatments.

Possibility for more effective treatment with fewer side effects

The second paper, published in Arthritis and Rheumatology, explored another facet of gut bacteria. Dr. Taneja treated one group of arthritis-susceptible mice with a bacterium, Prevotella histicola, and compared that to a group that had no treatment. The study found that mice treated with the bacterium had decreased symptom frequency and severity, and fewer inflammatory conditions associated with rheumatoid arthritis. The treatment produced fewer side effects, such as weight gain and villous atrophy — a condition that prevents the gut from absorbing nutrients — that may be linked with other, more traditional  treatments.

While human trials have not yet taken place, the mice’s immune systems and arthritis mimic humans, and shows promise for similar, positive effects. Since this bacterium is a part of healthy human gut, treatment is less likely to have side effects, says study co-author Joseph Murray, M.D., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder; it occurs when the body mistakenly attacks itself. The body breaks down tissues around joints, causing swelling that can erode bone and deform the joints. The disease can damage other parts of the body, including the skin, eyes, heart, lung and blood vessels.

The study was funded by the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, which supports research that aims to find treatments compatible with a patient’s unique genetic structure. It also supports the transformation of research discoveries into practical applications for patient care.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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lizatorborg

Tue, Jul 5 at 7:00am EST by @lizatorborg · View  

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Treatment of Osteoarthritis

a medical illustration of two knee joints - one healthy, the other with osteoarthritis and erroded cartilage 16X9

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My mother, 70, has osteoarthritis and was prescribed medication to help with the pain. What else can she do to keep it from worsening? Is physical therapy an option?

ANSWER: Osteoarthritis is a progressive disease that slowly gets worse over time. Although the process of osteoarthritis can’t be reversed, the symptoms usually can be effectively managed. Medication helps. Exercising regularly, staying at a healthy weight and lowering stress on joints makes a difference, too. For many people who have osteoarthritis, physical therapy is a useful part of their treatment plan.

Osteoarthritis happens when the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of bones in joints gradually breaks down. That leads to joint pain, tenderness and stiffness. Although osteoarthritis may damage any joint, it’s most common in the hands, knees, hips and spine.

As in your mother’s situation, medications such as acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, frequently are used to control osteoarthritis. Several topical medications are available that can reduce joint pain, too. They include, among others, capsaicin cream and a gel form of the NSAID ibuprofen.

Exercising on a regular basis also helps ease osteoarthritis symptoms. This is where physical therapy may be useful. A physical therapist can work with your mother to create an individual exercise program to strengthen the muscles around her joints, increasing her range of motion and reducing pain.

Low-impact exercises, such as swimming, biking and walking, usually work well. Some people also enjoy activities such as tai chi and yoga, which combine gentle exercises and stretching with deep breathing. A physical therapist can help your mother decide on the activities that are right for her.

Staying at a healthy weight also is an important part of managing osteoarthritis. Carrying extra weight increases the stress on weight-bearing joints, such as the knees and hips. Even a small amount of weight loss can relieve some pressure and decrease pain. If she would like to lose weight, your mother can ask her health care provider for a referral to a dietitian. He or she can discuss healthy weight-loss strategies, offer suggestions for meal planning and provide your mother with nutritious recipes to get started.

To keep her symptoms from getting worse, your mother should try to avoid overusing the joints affected by osteoarthritis. A variety of assistive devices are available that can make everyday tasks less stressful on joints. For example, using a cane takes weight off a painful knee or hip. Gripping and grabbing tools make it easier to open doors and jars. Encourage your mother to ask her health care provider for information about these and other assistive devices that might be useful for her.

Some forms of alternative medicine have been suggested for osteoarthritis treatment, too. Acupuncture — a technique that involves inserting extremely thin needles through the skin at strategic points on the body — may contribute to pain control for some people. Meditation may also ease osteoarthritis symptoms in certain cases.

The nutritional supplements glucosamine and chondroitin often are touted as effective treatment for osteoarthritis. Results from studies on these nutritional supplements have been mixed though. A few have found benefits for people with osteoarthritis, but most have shown no clear effects. If your mother is interested in trying these supplements, encourage her to talk with her health care provider first. Glucosamine is not safe for people who are allergic to shellfish. Also, glucosamine and chondroitin may interact with blood thinners, such as warfarin, and cause bleeding problems.

Before she goes forward with any additional treatment, it would be a good idea for your mother to make an appointment to see her health care provider, talk about her options and discuss the benefits and risks of each. From there, they can create a comprehensive treatment plan that will help keep your mother’s osteoarthritis symptoms under control. Dr. John Davis III, Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

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jenohara

Mon, May 23 at 3:00pm EST by @jenohara · View  

#MayoClinicRadio podcast 5/21/16

Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary being interviewed on Mayo Clinic Radio
Listen: Mayo Clinic Radio 05-21-16

On Mayo Clinic Radio this week, we discuss Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. Rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will talk about diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus.

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jstreed

Sun, May 22 at 4:26pm EST by @jstreed · View  

Awareness Saturday — Arthritis / Osteoporosis / Lupus: Mayo Clinic Radio

It's awareness Saturday on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, as May recognizes Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis affects 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. and is a leading cause of disability among working-age adults. Mayo Clinic rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will give an update on diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus.

Here's the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast.

 

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jenohara

Thu, May 19 at 7:00am EST by @jenohara · View  

Mayo Clinic Radio: Awareness Saturday — Arthritis / Osteoporosis / Lupus

close-up of hands with rheumatoid arthritis
It's awareness Saturday on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, as May recognizes Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis affects 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. and is a leading cause of disability among working-age adults. Mayo Clinic rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will give an update on diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus.

Listen to the program on Saturday, May 21, at 9:05 a.m. CDT, and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Access archived shows.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

 

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jstreed

Wed, May 18 at 10:38am EST by @jstreed · View  

Medication Markers for Rheumatoid Arthritis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

When it comes to treating rheumatoid arthritis, there can be lot of trial and error that can be involved before finding the best therapy.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Timothy Niewold explains how researchers are hoping to change that.

To listen, click the link below.

Medication Markers for RA

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jenohara

Mon, May 16 at 2:22pm EST by @jenohara · View  

Mayo Clinic Radio: Awareness Saturday — Arthritis / Osteoporosis / Lupus

It's awareness Saturday on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, as May recognizes Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis affects 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. and is a leading cause of disability among working-age adults. Mayo Clinic rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will give an update on diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus.

Listen to the program on Saturday, May 21, at 9:05 a.m. CDT.

Miss the show?  Here's the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio, and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

Access archived shows.

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jenohara

Mon, Apr 4 at 7:45am EST by @jenohara · View  

Housecall: Allergy-Proof Your Home

gloved hands spraying cleaner on a bathroom sink faucet and wiping with a cleaning rag
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Loss of taste and smell: Natural with aging?
After age 60, your ability to taste and smell things may fade a bit. Getting older may play a role, but not always.

Bipolar disorder in children: Is it possible?
Most often bipolar disorder is diagnosed in older children and teens, but it can occur in kids of any age. Here are the signs.

PLUS ADDITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS
Weight training: Improve your muscular fitness
Tips for eating well during chemotherapy
Video: Freezing heart muscle
Slideshow: Hand exercises for people with arthritis

HEALTHY RECIPES
Broiled grouper with teriyaki sauce
Baked chicken and wild rice with onion and tarragon
Poached pears
Apple dumpling

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
What stresses you out?
Effective stress management starts with identifying your sources of stress. One way to do this is to make a list of the situations, concerns or challenges that trigger your stress response. Take a moment to write down the top 10 issues you're facing right now. Once you know what stresses you out, you can start developing ways to put stress in its place.

Need practical advice on diet and exercise? Want creative solutions for stress and other lifestyle issues? Discover even more healthy lifestyle topics at MayoClinic.org.

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Nutrition-wise: Rate your plate
Working on wellness? Take a moment to evaluate your progress with this healthy eating quiz.

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jstreed

Thu, Mar 3 at 11:28am EST by @jstreed · View  

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Kidney Disease: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Rheumatoid arthritis is known for it's affects on the joints, but as we learn in this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, the kidney can also be at risk.

To listen, click the link below.

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Kidney Disease

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danasparks

Wed, Jan 20 at 5:02pm EST by @danasparks · View  

Complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis

close-up of hands with rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that typically affects the small joints in your hands and feet. Unlike the wear-and-tear damage of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of your joints, causing a painful swelling that can eventually result in bone erosion and joint deformity.

Complications

Rheumatoid arthritis increases your risk of developing:

  • Osteoporosis. Rheumatoid arthritis itself, along with some medications used for treating rheumatoid arthritis, can increase your risk of osteoporosis — a condition that weakens your bones and makes them more prone to fracture.
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome. If rheumatoid arthritis affects your wrist, the inflammation can compress the nerve that serves most of your hand and fingers.
  • Heart problems. Rheumatoid arthritis can increase your risk of hardened and blocked arteries, as well as inflammation of the sac that encloses your heart.
  • Lung disease. People with rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk of inflammation and scarring of the lung tissues, which can lead to progressive shortness of breath.

Read about the symptoms, causes, treatments, risk factors and more. 

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