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danasparks

5 days ago by @danasparks · View  

Discovery's Edge: The rheumatoid arthritis and heart disease connection

a medical illustration for rheumatoid arthritis and heart disease graphic on Discovery's Edge

Physicians have long known that people with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic conditions such as lupus are more likely to die at younger ages than are those without these conditions. Even with advances in treatment, the gap in life expectancy remains.

No one knew why until 15 years ago. That’s when researchers at Mayo Clinic helped establish that people with rheumatoid arthritis have a greater chance of developing various types of cardiovascular disease.

“We now know that rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an increased risk of heart and vascular disease,” says senior researcher Sherine E. Gabriel, M.D., a rheumatologist and epidemiologist previously in the Department of Health Sciences Research at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota. “What is less understood is why people with rheumatoid arthritis develop that increased risk.”

The evidence increasingly points to inflammation as a major contributor to that increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

In rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system attacks the synovium — the lining of the membranes around the joints. The resulting inflammation thickens the synovium, which can, in turn, eventually destroy cartilage and bone in the joint.

Inflammation can also cause the inner linings of arteries to swell. This narrows the arteries, raises blood pressure, and reduces blood flow to the heart and other organs.
Read the rest of the article on Discovery's Edge.
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mforliti

Thu, Aug 11 at 8:16am EDT by @mforliti · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Link Senescent Cells to Most Common Form of Arthritis

close-up of hands with rheumatoid arthritisROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic have reported a causal link between senescent cells — cells that accumulate with age and contribute to frailty and disease — and osteoarthritis in mice. Their findings appear online in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences.

Osteoarthritis is the leading form of arthritis in the elderly, causing pain, disability and immobility. The disease impacted 30.8 million adults from 2008 to 2011, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The only therapeutics currently available include treatments focused on pain control, joint replacement surgery or mobility aides, such as canes, braces and walkers.

“Osteoarthritis has previously been associated with the accumulation of senescent cells in or near the joints, however, this is the first time there has been evidence of a causal link,” says James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging. “Additionally, we have developed a new senescent cell transplantation model that allows us to test whether clearing senescent cells alleviates or delays osteoarthritis.”

Using the new model, researchers injected small numbers of senescent and non-senescent cells from ear cartilage into the knee joint area of mice. After tracking the injected cells in the mice for more than 10 days using bioluminescence and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, they found that the injection of the senescent cells into the knee region caused leg pain, impaired mobility and characteristics of osteoarthritis, including damage to surrounding cartilage, X-ray changes, increased pain and impaired function.

“We believe that targeting senescent cells could be a promising way to prevent or alleviate age-related osteoarthritis,” says Dr. Kirkland. “While there is more work to be done, these findings are a critical step toward that goal.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Megan Forliti, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health grants R01 AG013925, R21 AG047984, K01AR065397, R01AR068103, MRM2015 6272; the Orthopedic Research and Education Foundation in collaboration with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute; The Connor Group; and the Noaber Foundation.

Others on the research team include: Ming Xu, Ph.D.; Elizabeth Bradley, M.D.; Megan Weivoda, Ph.D.; Soyun Hwang; Tamar Pirtskhalava, Ph.D.; Teresa Decklever; Geoffry Curran; Mikolaj Ogrodnik; Kurt Johnson; Val Lowe, M.D.; Tamar Tchkonia, Ph.D.; and Jennifer Westendorf, Ph.D., all of Mayo Clinic, as well as Diana Jurk of Newcastle University.

Mayo Clinic and Drs. Kirkland, Tchkonia, and Pirtskhalava have a financial interest related to this research.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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coletterector

Mon, Jul 11 at 11:57am EDT by @coletterector · View  

Study: Gut Bacteria can Cause, Predict and Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis

close-up of elderly hands

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The bacteria in your gut do more than break down your food. They also can predict susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis, suggests Veena Taneja, Ph.D., an immunologist at Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine. Dr. Taneja recently published two studies ─ one in Genome Medicine and one in Arthritis and Rheumatology ─ connecting the dots between gut microbiota and rheumatoid arthritis.

More than 1.5 million Americans have rheumatoid arthritis, a disorder that causes painful swelling in the joints. Scientists have a limited understanding of the processes that trigger the disease. Dr. Taneja and her team identified intestinal bacteria as a possible cause; their studies indicate that testing for specific microbiota in the gut can help physicians predict and prevent the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

“These are exciting discoveries that we may be able to use to personalize treatment for patients,” Dr. Taneja says.

The paper published in Genome Medicine summarizes a study of rheumatoid arthritis patients, their relatives and a healthy control group. The study aimed to find a biomarker — or a substance that indicates a disease, condition or phenomena — that predicts susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. They noted that an abundance of certain rare bacterial lineages causes a microbial imbalance that is found in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

MEDIA CONTACT: Colette Rector, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

“Using genomic sequencing technology, we were able to pin down some gut microbes that were normally rare and of low abundance in healthy individuals, but expanded in patients with rheumatoid arthritis,” Dr. Taneja says.

Implications for predicting and preventing rheumatoid arthritis

After further research in mice and, eventually, humans, intestinal microbiota and metabolic signatures could help scientists build a predictive profile for who is likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis and the course the disease will take, Dr. Taneja says.

Based on mouse studies, researchers found an association between the gut microbe Collinsella and the arthritis phenotype. The presence of these bacteria may lead to new ways to diagnose patients and to reduce the imbalance that causes rheumatoid arthritis before or in its early stages, according to John Davis III, M.D., and Eric Matteson, M.D., Mayo Clinic rheumatologists and study co-authors. Continued research could lead to preventive treatments.

Possibility for more effective treatment with fewer side effects

The second paper, published in Arthritis and Rheumatology, explored another facet of gut bacteria. Dr. Taneja treated one group of arthritis-susceptible mice with a bacterium, Prevotella histicola, and compared that to a group that had no treatment. The study found that mice treated with the bacterium had decreased symptom frequency and severity, and fewer inflammatory conditions associated with rheumatoid arthritis. The treatment produced fewer side effects, such as weight gain and villous atrophy — a condition that prevents the gut from absorbing nutrients — that may be linked with other, more traditional  treatments.

While human trials have not yet taken place, the mice’s immune systems and arthritis mimic humans, and shows promise for similar, positive effects. Since this bacterium is a part of healthy human gut, treatment is less likely to have side effects, says study co-author Joseph Murray, M.D., a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder; it occurs when the body mistakenly attacks itself. The body breaks down tissues around joints, causing swelling that can erode bone and deform the joints. The disease can damage other parts of the body, including the skin, eyes, heart, lung and blood vessels.

The study was funded by the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, which supports research that aims to find treatments compatible with a patient’s unique genetic structure. It also supports the transformation of research discoveries into practical applications for patient care.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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lizatorborg

Tue, Jul 5 at 7:00am EDT by @lizatorborg · View  

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Treatment of Osteoarthritis

a medical illustration of two knee joints - one healthy, the other with osteoarthritis and erroded cartilage 16X9

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My mother, 70, has osteoarthritis and was prescribed medication to help with the pain. What else can she do to keep it from worsening? Is physical therapy an option?

ANSWER: Osteoarthritis is a progressive disease that slowly gets worse over time. Although the process of osteoarthritis can’t be reversed, the symptoms usually can be effectively managed. Medication helps. Exercising regularly, staying at a healthy weight and lowering stress on joints makes a difference, too. For many people who have osteoarthritis, physical therapy is a useful part of their treatment plan.

Osteoarthritis happens when the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of bones in joints gradually breaks down. That leads to joint pain, tenderness and stiffness. Although osteoarthritis may damage any joint, it’s most common in the hands, knees, hips and spine.

As in your mother’s situation, medications such as acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, frequently are used to control osteoarthritis. Several topical medications are available that can reduce joint pain, too. They include, among others, capsaicin cream and a gel form of the NSAID ibuprofen.

Exercising on a regular basis also helps ease osteoarthritis symptoms. This is where physical therapy may be useful. A physical therapist can work with your mother to create an individual exercise program to strengthen the muscles around her joints, increasing her range of motion and reducing pain.

Low-impact exercises, such as swimming, biking and walking, usually work well. Some people also enjoy activities such as tai chi and yoga, which combine gentle exercises and stretching with deep breathing. A physical therapist can help your mother decide on the activities that are right for her.

Staying at a healthy weight also is an important part of managing osteoarthritis. Carrying extra weight increases the stress on weight-bearing joints, such as the knees and hips. Even a small amount of weight loss can relieve some pressure and decrease pain. If she would like to lose weight, your mother can ask her health care provider for a referral to a dietitian. He or she can discuss healthy weight-loss strategies, offer suggestions for meal planning and provide your mother with nutritious recipes to get started.

To keep her symptoms from getting worse, your mother should try to avoid overusing the joints affected by osteoarthritis. A variety of assistive devices are available that can make everyday tasks less stressful on joints. For example, using a cane takes weight off a painful knee or hip. Gripping and grabbing tools make it easier to open doors and jars. Encourage your mother to ask her health care provider for information about these and other assistive devices that might be useful for her.

Some forms of alternative medicine have been suggested for osteoarthritis treatment, too. Acupuncture — a technique that involves inserting extremely thin needles through the skin at strategic points on the body — may contribute to pain control for some people. Meditation may also ease osteoarthritis symptoms in certain cases.

The nutritional supplements glucosamine and chondroitin often are touted as effective treatment for osteoarthritis. Results from studies on these nutritional supplements have been mixed though. A few have found benefits for people with osteoarthritis, but most have shown no clear effects. If your mother is interested in trying these supplements, encourage her to talk with her health care provider first. Glucosamine is not safe for people who are allergic to shellfish. Also, glucosamine and chondroitin may interact with blood thinners, such as warfarin, and cause bleeding problems.

Before she goes forward with any additional treatment, it would be a good idea for your mother to make an appointment to see her health care provider, talk about her options and discuss the benefits and risks of each. From there, they can create a comprehensive treatment plan that will help keep your mother’s osteoarthritis symptoms under control. Dr. John Davis III, Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

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jenohara

Mon, May 23 at 3:00pm EDT by @jenohara · View  

#MayoClinicRadio podcast 5/21/16

Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary being interviewed on Mayo Clinic Radio
Listen: Mayo Clinic Radio 05-21-16

On Mayo Clinic Radio this week, we discuss Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. Rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will talk about diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus.

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jstreed

Sun, May 22 at 4:26pm EDT by @jstreed · View  

Awareness Saturday — Arthritis / Osteoporosis / Lupus: Mayo Clinic Radio

It's awareness Saturday on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, as May recognizes Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis affects 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. and is a leading cause of disability among working-age adults. Mayo Clinic rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will give an update on diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus.

Here's the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast.

 

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jenohara

Thu, May 19 at 7:00am EDT by @jenohara · View  

Mayo Clinic Radio: Awareness Saturday — Arthritis / Osteoporosis / Lupus

close-up of hands with rheumatoid arthritis
It's awareness Saturday on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, as May recognizes Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis affects 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. and is a leading cause of disability among working-age adults. Mayo Clinic rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will give an update on diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus.

Listen to the program on Saturday, May 21, at 9:05 a.m. CDT, and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Access archived shows.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

 

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jstreed

Wed, May 18 at 10:38am EDT by @jstreed · View  

Medication Markers for Rheumatoid Arthritis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

When it comes to treating rheumatoid arthritis, there can be lot of trial and error that can be involved before finding the best therapy.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Timothy Niewold explains how researchers are hoping to change that.

To listen, click the link below.

Medication Markers for RA

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jenohara

Mon, May 16 at 2:22pm EDT by @jenohara · View  

Mayo Clinic Radio: Awareness Saturday — Arthritis / Osteoporosis / Lupus

It's awareness Saturday on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, as May recognizes Arthritis Awareness Month, Osteoporosis Awareness Month and Lupus Awareness Month. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis affects 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. and is a leading cause of disability among working-age adults. Mayo Clinic rheumatologist Dr. John Davis III will give an update on diagnosing and treating arthritis. Also on the program, endocrinologist Dr. Robert Wermers has an update on new treatments for osteoporosis. And, rheumatologist Dr. Vaidehi Chowdhary explains the importance of recognizing those who suffer from the chronic inflammatory disease lupus.

Listen to the program on Saturday, May 21, at 9:05 a.m. CDT.

Miss the show?  Here's the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio, and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

Access archived shows.

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jenohara

Mon, Apr 4 at 7:45am EDT by @jenohara · View  

Housecall: Allergy-Proof Your Home

gloved hands spraying cleaner on a bathroom sink faucet and wiping with a cleaning rag
THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Allergy-proof your home
Thinking about spring cleaning? If you have hay fever or allergic asthma, it's also a good time to rid your home of what's causing your allergies.

7 signs and symptoms not to ignore
Some subtle symptoms — such as shortness of breath — could be red flags for more serious problems. Take note of these signs.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Loss of taste and smell: Natural with aging?
After age 60, your ability to taste and smell things may fade a bit. Getting older may play a role, but not always.

Bipolar disorder in children: Is it possible?
Most often bipolar disorder is diagnosed in older children and teens, but it can occur in kids of any age. Here are the signs.

PLUS ADDITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS
Weight training: Improve your muscular fitness
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Video: Freezing heart muscle
Slideshow: Hand exercises for people with arthritis

HEALTHY RECIPES
Broiled grouper with teriyaki sauce
Baked chicken and wild rice with onion and tarragon
Poached pears
Apple dumpling

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
What stresses you out?
Effective stress management starts with identifying your sources of stress. One way to do this is to make a list of the situations, concerns or challenges that trigger your stress response. Take a moment to write down the top 10 issues you're facing right now. Once you know what stresses you out, you can start developing ways to put stress in its place.

Need practical advice on diet and exercise? Want creative solutions for stress and other lifestyle issues? Discover even more healthy lifestyle topics at MayoClinic.org.

NOW BLOGGING
Nutrition-wise: Rate your plate
Working on wellness? Take a moment to evaluate your progress with this healthy eating quiz.

Receive a free e-subscription to Housecall and other health newsletters.

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jstreed

Thu, Mar 3 at 11:28am EDT by @jstreed · View  

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Kidney Disease: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

Rheumatoid arthritis is known for it's affects on the joints, but as we learn in this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, the kidney can also be at risk.

To listen, click the link below.

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Kidney Disease

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danasparks

Wed, Jan 20 at 5:02pm EDT by @danasparks · View  

Complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis

close-up of hands with rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that typically affects the small joints in your hands and feet. Unlike the wear-and-tear damage of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of your joints, causing a painful swelling that can eventually result in bone erosion and joint deformity.

Complications

Rheumatoid arthritis increases your risk of developing:

  • Osteoporosis. Rheumatoid arthritis itself, along with some medications used for treating rheumatoid arthritis, can increase your risk of osteoporosis — a condition that weakens your bones and makes them more prone to fracture.
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome. If rheumatoid arthritis affects your wrist, the inflammation can compress the nerve that serves most of your hand and fingers.
  • Heart problems. Rheumatoid arthritis can increase your risk of hardened and blocked arteries, as well as inflammation of the sac that encloses your heart.
  • Lung disease. People with rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk of inflammation and scarring of the lung tissues, which can lead to progressive shortness of breath.

Read about the symptoms, causes, treatments, risk factors and more. 

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jstreed

Tue, Jan 19 at 11:09am EDT by @jstreed · View  

Thumb Arthritis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

It can make some of the most everyday actions painful, even impossible.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Sanj Kakar discusses thumb arthritis.

To listen, click the link below.

Thumb Arthritis

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lizatorborg

Nov 28, 2015 by @lizatorborg · View  

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Cartilage repair, restoration becoming more common

person with injured knee and knee pain

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I recently heard about cartilage being used in knee joints. Last summer I was diagnosed with osteopenia, degenerative arthritis, moderate lateral compartment narrowing, and knee joint effusion in my right knee. I can no longer straighten it and have some swelling. I’ve had two injections, which helped with the pain for a time, but am wondering if cartilage would help in my situation.

medical illustration of a knee and damaged cartilage

ANSWER: Procedures to restore and repair cartilage are becoming more common. In situations like yours, however, where there is significant cartilage loss, these procedures typically are not successful. But there are other effective options for treating the symptoms associated with arthritis in your knee and the conditions accompanying it.

Your knee has two kinds of cartilage. The first is articular cartilage. It provides a smooth, lubricated surface within the joint. The second is the meniscus. It provides a cushion to the articular cartilage during weight-bearing activities.

The issues you’re dealing with involve the articular cartilage. When problems arise in the articular cartilage, they are the result of a focal injury or defect, or they happen due to arthritis — a diffuse loss of cartilage. [...]

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lizatorborg

Nov 14, 2015 by @lizatorborg · View  

Mayo Clinic Q and A: With psoriatic arthritis, the sooner therapy is started, the better

closeup of itchy dry skin, psoriasis on elbow

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I was recently diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis and am confused about all of the treatment options. What do you recommend for your patients?

ANSWER: Psoriatic arthritis is a type of arthritis that develops in some people who have psoriasis — a chronic skin condition characterized by thickened, reddish patches of skin that are often flecked with dry, white scales. It can cause painful, swollen joints — similar to rheumatoid arthritis. Any joint can be affected, and the pain can range from mild to severe. In both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, you may find that symptoms flare up, recede and then flare up again.

People with psoriatic arthritis often feel worn down by the chronic itching and pain that accompany the two diseases. Although there’s no cure, there are effective treatments that can help relieve the symptoms and even help prevent further joint damage. The sooner therapy is started, the less time the disease has to progress and cause permanent damage to your joints.  [...]

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stheimer

Nov 9, 2015 by @stheimer · View  

Deaths From Heart Disease Declining Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are twice as likely as the average person to develop heart disease, but a new study shows that efforts to prevent heart problems and diagnose and treat heart disease early may be paying off. Despite the heightened danger, deaths from cardiovascular disease among people with rheumatoid arthritis are declining, the research found. The study was among Mayo Clinic research being presented at the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting in San Francisco.

Other Mayo studies discussed at the conference chronicled a significant increase in gout; examined rare intestinal microbes in rheumatoid arthritis patients; and discovered that people with rheumatoid arthritis use opioid painkillers at a hCoronary artery diseaseigher rate than the general public, but that it isn’t related to disease severity.

In the study on rheumatoid arthritis and heart disease, researchers looked at heart disease deaths within 10 years of rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis among two groups of people: 315 patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis from 2000 to 2007 and 498 patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in the 1980s and 1990s. They also looked at heart disease deaths among 813 people without the rheumatic disease. Roughly two-thirds of patients studied were women, and the average age was 60.

They found a significantly lower rate of deaths from heart disease in the more recently diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis patients than in those diagnosed earlier: 2.8 percent and 7.9 percent, respectively.

Media contact: Sharon Theimer in Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005 or [email protected].

[...]

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lizatorborg

Oct 17, 2015 by @lizatorborg · View  

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Nonsurgical treatments may decrease pain from spinal stenosis

medical illustration o f spinal stenosis

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I was diagnosed with spinal stenosis about 12 years ago. I haven’t had many symptoms over the years, but about six months ago I started noticing increasing discomfort in my legs. Is surgery an option to treat spinal stenosis? If not, what else can I do? The leg pain is making it hard for me to walk.

ANSWER: Surgery usually isn’t necessary to treat spinal stenosis. Often a combination of lifestyle changes, physical therapy and medication can effectively decrease the pain and discomfort caused by this common back problem.

Spinal stenosis occurs when the open space within your spine narrows, causing pressure and irritation to the nerve tissue. It can happen for a variety of reasons, but most of the time spinal stenosis is a result of aging and the buildup of arthritis. In some cases, spinal stenosis does not cause any symptoms and may be found during a medical test done for another reason. Spinal stenosis, and the nerve compression that is associated with it, tends to develop slowly. Over time, it can put pressure on your spinal cord and the nerves that travel through the spine to your arms and legs, and possibly cause symptoms.

If the nerves affected are in your neck — the part of your spine called the cervical spine — that may cause numbness, weakness or tingling in an arm or hand, or trouble with coordination in a leg or foot. It often causes problems with walking and balance. Nerves to your bladder or bowel can be affected, too. [...]

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jstreed

Oct 12, 2015 by @jstreed · View  

Exercise and Osteoarthritis: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Shreyasee Amin has some tips on staying active while dealing with the pain of osteoarthritis.

To listen, click the link below.

Exercise and osteoarthritis

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jstreed

Aug 24, 2015 by @jstreed · View  

Quality Health Care/Enlarged Prostate/Thumb Arthritis: Mayo Clinic Radio

Quality health care is something we all want. But what does it mean ... and how can we find it? This week on Mayo Clinic Radio, endocrinologist Dr. Victor Montori outlines the criteria you can use in choosing a quality provider. Also on the program, one of the most common problems men have as they age is an enlarged prostate gland - urologist Dr. Amy Krambeck explains how an enlarged prostate, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia, is diagnosed and treated; and severe pain, swelling and decreased range of motion in your thumb may be a sign of arthritis - orthopedic surgeon Dr. Sanjeev Kakar discusses what can be done to treat thumb arthritis.

Here's the podcast: MayoClinicRadio 08-22-15 PODCAST

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jenohara

Aug 20, 2015 by @jenohara · View  

Mayo Clinic Radio

new mother in hospital bed holding babyQuality health care is something we all want. But what does it mean ... and how can we find it? This week on Mayo Clinic Radio, endocrinologist Dr. Victor Montori outlines the criteria you can use in choosing a quality provider. Also on the program, one of the most common problems men have as they age is an enlarged prostate gland - urologist Dr. Amy Krambeck explains how an enlarged prostate, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia, is diagnosed and treated; and severe pain, swelling and decreased range of motion in your thumb may be a sign of arthritis - orthopedic surgeon Dr. Sanjeev Kakar discusses what can be done to treat thumb arthritis.

Myth or Matter-of-Fact: The number of a particular procedure done each year by a provider can be one indicator of the quality.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeartRadio.

Click here to listen to the program at 9:05 a.m. CT, Saturday, August 22 and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

 

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