• By Jen O'Hara

Monday's Housecall

March 23, 2015

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THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Overuse injury: How to prevent training injurieswoman on a training run
Milder temperatures may encourage you to get outside and start exercising. Try these tips to stay injury-free.

Snacks: How they fit into your weight-loss plan
Snacks don't have to be a guilty pleasure. Discover creative ways to satisfy your hunger without sabotaging your weight-loss plan.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Valerian: A safe and effective herbal sleep aid?
If you have insomnia and are thinking about taking a valerian supplement to catch some z's, here are some things to consider.

Food allergy vs. food intolerance
A food intolerance can cause some of the same signs as a food allergy, so people often confuse the two.

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PLUS ADDITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS
Metabolic syndrome
Virtual colonoscopy
Corneal abrasion (scratch): First aid
Slide show: 5 vegetable main dishes

HEALTHY RECIPES
Sweet carrots
Wild rice pilaf with cranberries and apples
Pork medallions with five-spice powder
Salad greens with pears, fennel and walnuts

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
No pain, no gain? No way!

When it comes to exercise, the "No pain, no gain" mantra is bad advice. Exercise shouldn't hurt. At most, you may feel a little muscle soreness when you do a new workout or activity. If you feel pain during exercise (or dizziness, nausea or shortness of breath), stop. You may be pushing yourself too hard.

Need practical advice on diet and exercise? Want creative solutions for stress and other lifestyle issues? Discover even more healthy lifestyle topics at MayoClinic.org.

NOW BLOGGING
Pregnancy and you: Listeria during pregnancy: Cause for concern?
Worried about listeria during pregnancy? A Mayo Clinic specialist helps put the risk in perspective. 

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Alzheimer's disease brain pathology is illustrated using thioflavin-S fluorescent microscopy, which reveals both neurofibrillary tangles (flame-shaped structures) and amyloid plaque pathology (rounded structures). Through the use of the amyloid brain scanning, we are now able to visualize amyloid accumulation in the brains of living individuals – visualized with warmer colors.