• By Dennis Douda

Glen Campbell Documentary Shares Alzheimer’s Journey

February 9, 2015


Alzheimer's Disease
has been steadily encroaching into singer, songwriter Glen Campbell's life. Instead of retreating to deal with the challenges privately, Glen and his family decided to share their struggle with documentary filmmakers. The production called Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me by PCH Films, includes both heartwarming and candidly frank moments Mr. Campbell experienced during his visits to Mayo Clinic for care.

Ronald Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, praised the Campbell family for their determination to raise awareness about the condition's impact on patients, as well as their caregivers. [TRT 4:20]

*Special note: Glen Campbell and Julian Raymond won the Best Country Song Grammy Award for Glen's final song, "I'm Not Gonna Miss You," from Academy Award nominated documentary, Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me.

Journalists: A broadcast quality video package is available in the downloads. Click here for full script. 

I was very impressed with Dr. Noseworthy's responses during this discussion. Thank you for representing Mayo Clinic in such a professional, well-informed dialogue.

COMMENT

I thought Dr. Noseworthy's comments were particularly well expressed in contrast and in conjunction with Toby Cosgrove's comments. Most impressive, though was his handling of David Gregory's question about legalizing marijuana. Noseworthy put on an impressive display of medical history knowledge that seemed to dispel concerns about the question posed to him. His perspective was both disarming and intellectually stimulating.

COMMENT

It was interesting to hear from both of these individuals that they too do not know all the ramifications of what the Affordable Care Act is going to do (good, bad or otherwise). What is hard to understand as an employee of such a large institution (like Mayo Clinic or the Cleveland Clinic) is when changes are made in decreasing benefits and decreasing the numbers in staffing, but no real facts to support why these changes are or will be made.

COMMENT

I feel Dr. Noseworthy has an excellent response in the interview. Mayo Clinic is very special, as we have a unique healthcare organization, unlike many others in our country, so when hearing the president express how Mayo Clinic "…can drive down costs…" I feel that is an ambiguous statement as to where this is occuring. And even if true in particular areas, other doctors all over our country could not sustain a payment reduction of specific nature due to their particular structure…so who does that leave left for the care of the sick when the others fail financially…Mayo and the Cleveland Clinic? I feel that the presidents statement is misrepresented by wishful thinking. I am happy to hear the candid responses as to the unknow fall out commented…they were real and truthful answers!

COMMENT

Greater efficiency, modernized payment systems, technology upgrades and improved delivery based on results does drive down costs. The POTUS cites us because healthcare cost have been unaffordable and we recognized the inevitable effects (the uninsured are bankrupting states) and are doing something about it.

COMMENT

Driving down costs is beneficial if, and only if, everyone will participate by providing care to the indigent/uninsured, and underinsured, equally. Not all health care providers,(hospitals, clinics, etc.),do. Some facilities are hampered by the fact the bulk of their patients are uninsured/underinsured. These providers experience higher costs from non-reimbursement due to the percentage of patients they treat in this category. These patients generally are the ones who are more non-complient about following perscribed care plans, for various reasons, (mental health, educational, homelessness issues, etc). Without addressing the reasons behind the non-compliance, health care costs will never decrease. Basing reimbursement on successful outcomes, (keeping the patient from being re-admitted or re-treated within a specified time frame after discharge), works only for providers who aren't hampered by the ability of the patients they treat, to follow specified care plans once they're released.

COMMENT

"Without addressing the reasons behind the non-compliance, health care costs will never decrease." Yes, the homeless, less educated and mentally ill are probably less likely to buy insurance and comply, but the much bigger issue with costs are the much larger number who simply don't think they need insurance or can't afford it because of ever increasingly expensive medical insurance. The ACA, as rough as it is, attempts to address this for the very first time. The down trodden are certainly a percentage that costs our states millions in indigent care, but they are but a percentage of the growing populace who simply can't afford health care due to a variety of dubious reasons. There are state and federal agencies who try to help care for the group you describe, but at the end of the day –if they refuse help, can't help themselves and fall through the cracks …we, as a wealthy nation should be able to say, we tried.

COMMENT

It was reassuring to see that they are optimistic about moving forward. The ACA may not be perfect (I don't know much about it honestly), but at least it can always be tweaked as time goes on. It's refreshing to see people respond intelligently to this topic rather than emotionally, or approached with political bias. Also, I was (pleasantly) surprised to hear Dr. Noseworthy's thorough response to the last question. That kind of caught me off guard, but I appreciate that the response was honest and neutral. That seemed like one that, from a PR standpoint, would normally be avoided with a superficial response. I don't watch TV, so I guess I forgot that's a hot topic right now. Either way, I appreciate Dr. Noseworthy's honesty and transparency in leadership. Great interview!

COMMENT

Also among those who are less likely to purchase insurance: young adults. If my adult offspring are any indication, it isn't a question of young healthy adults feeling invincible so much as it is being very strapped for cash and being much more likely to be employed by employers who don't provide health insurance coverage, don't provide good health insurance coverage, or piecing together a living by working multiple part time jobs while working unpaid internships, none of which provide health care coverage. While my kids are paying for insurance, they are paying far more for insurance than my Mayo Employee portion of my health care coverage and have much higher deductibles, high co-pays ($100/office visit) while earning far under half what I earn as a Mayo employee. Unfortunately, they are not unusual: many young adults are in the exact same position: early in their careers, earning little, and working for employers who do not offer good benefits. Sure, some may qualify for subsidies, but none of them is sure how much, if any subsidy they will get and their future subsidy does not address their present day cash flow problems. Expect young adults to further delay marriage, home ownership and parenthood, all personal choices, yes, but choices which profoundly affect the structure of our society and our economy.

COMMENT
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