• By Bob Nellis

Physician burnout: Mayo researchers identify effective interventions

October 4, 2016

Stressed young female medical doctor sitting at the desk in office.ROCHESTER, Minn. — After highlighting that more than half of American physicians are experiencing burnout, Mayo Clinic researchers now have identified some solutions that are being used to prevent or lessen burnout around the world. The findings show that some of the approaches being used are effective and making a difference. The article appears in the journal The Lancet.

The researchers identified more than 2,600 research articles that dealt with outcomes and approaches to physician burnout. They found 15 randomized clinical trials and 37 cohort studies that collectively included more than 3,600 physicians.

“We conducted an extensive search and compared the effectiveness of interventions across a range of burnout outcomes,” says lead author Colin West, M.D., Ph.D. “It’s clear that both individual strategies and structured organizational approaches are effective in achieving clinically meaningful reductions in burnout.”

Effective individual-focused strategies include mindfulness training, stress management training and small group sessions. Organizational changes that seem to work include limiting physician duty hours and a range of care delivery process changes in hospitals and clinics.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284 5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Mayo Clinic has been using some of these approaches with noticeable effects, including group interaction sessions in which the institution provides a designated lunch gathering monthly for breakout groups of physicians, so they can talk confidentially about their experiences with each other according to a structured curriculum.

The investigators say more research is needed as most published data come from observational studies and that validation of many of the solutions still is needed. In addition, the effect of combinations of interventions and their long-term benefits should be the focus of additional study.

Co-authors of the article are Liselotte Dyrbye, M.D., Tait Shanafelt, M.D. and Patricia Erwin, M.L.S. The research was supported by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Research Institute and Mayo Clinic.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Comment


davidbehar
@davidbehar

Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 10, 2016
Posted by @davidbehar, Nov 17, 2016

Your article is PC and silly.

Here, real help for doctors facing burnout.

1) It is done intentionally by lawyers in government, and by rich insurance executives, to save money. Each physician generates $millions in costs per year. What the lawyers do not understand is that the return on these costs is 10 times more. Doctors are being played and demoralized on purpose.

2) Your duty is to your patients. Those obstructing care are mortal enemies of your patients. The word, mortal, is physical, and not rhetorical. The lawyers and insurance executives are trying to kill your patients. The deceased generate no medical costs, enriching the mortal enemies of your patients.

3) Fighting back is the best way to prevent burnout, a) legal complaints against all parties obstructing care, because complaints generate legal costs; 2) black lists of enemies of clinical care, with an enforced medical boycott of the people on those lists; 3) direct action groups, by patients and their families, driving out these mortal enemies of patients from the state.

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